Los Angeles withdraws controversial ‘homeless in hotels’ ballot measure

PLEASE LOGIN TO VIEW THIS CONTENT

NOT A MEMBER? JOIN TODAY!

The Los Angeles city council decided to remove a controversial March 2024 ballot measure to require hotels to host homeless individuals in unsold rooms after a wave of controversy and pushback from business leaders.

Under a compromise measure passed with zero opposing votes, the city will require new hotels to build new affordable housing at a one-to-one basis for units displaced by the new hotel’s construction, and will create a voluntary program to house homeless in hotels at negotiated rates.

“We thank the LA City Council for brokering a compromise to get the homeless-in-hotels measure off the ballot,” said Chip Rogers, president and CEO of the American Housing and Lodging Association, which ran a significant public campaign against the measure, in a public statement.

The measure was put forth by Unite Here Local 11, a regional hospitality union with 32,000 members becoming a major political powerhouse in Southern California and Arizona. Unite Here, which previously employed Los Angeles City Council member Hugo Soto-Martinez as an organizer and paid him $$68,618 in 2021, easily collected the necessary signatures to bring the measure to the ballot. Unite Here Local 11 is currently on strike in Los Angeles as it negotiates new contracts with over 100 businesses across the city. While Los Angeles City Council could have voted to adopt the measure outright, it instead unanimously voted to punt the decision to voters.

NEXT

Los Angeles withdraws controversial ‘homeless in hotels’ ballot measure

PLEASE LOGIN TO VIEW THIS CONTENT

NOT A MEMBER? JOIN TODAY!

The Los Angeles city council decided to remove a controversial March 2024 ballot measure to require hotels to host homeless individuals in unsold rooms after a wave of controversy and pushback from business leaders.

Under a compromise measure passed with zero opposing votes, the city will require new hotels to build new affordable housing at a one-to-one basis for units displaced by the new hotel’s construction, and will create a voluntary program to house homeless in hotels at negotiated rates.

“We thank the LA City Council for brokering a compromise to get the homeless-in-hotels measure off the ballot,” said Chip Rogers, president and CEO of the American Housing and Lodging Association, which ran a significant public campaign against the measure, in a public statement.

The measure was put forth by Unite Here Local 11, a regional hospitality union with 32,000 members becoming a major political powerhouse in Southern California and Arizona. Unite Here, which previously employed Los Angeles City Council member Hugo Soto-Martinez as an organizer and paid him $$68,618 in 2021, easily collected the necessary signatures to bring the measure to the ballot. Unite Here Local 11 is currently on strike in Los Angeles as it negotiates new contracts with over 100 businesses across the city. While Los Angeles City Council could have voted to adopt the measure outright, it instead unanimously voted to punt the decision to voters.